Athletics / Featured

From Rockies to Rock Walls

I have answered the question “where’s Mr. McGovern?” several times during the last few weeks. Now that he’s been gone for a few months, the real question is: who’s replaced him? That’s where Jacon Mayer comes in. Jacon has already almost completely revamped the rock wall and it’s only been about a month. He’s transformed climbing classes: it’s now a place where students can not only climb ropes, but also boulder, as in climbing without ropes, or even set their own routes. But really, who is he? And how’d he get to Dana Hall?

Jacon, to put it in simpler terms, “saw a job ad.” And voila, here he is. He moved to Boston full time about a year and a half ago to be close to the mountains in Vermont and New Hampshire, and he has already been involved with the Wellesley High School sailing team for four years. When there came an opportunity to become a climbing instructor right here in Wellesley, he took it.

But how’d he get here of all places? Well, before Jacon become an assistant coach to the Wellesley sailing team, he was a professional sailor. He worked at a yacht club in New York, but began to feel like he was “helping a bunch of super rich people have fun with their toys.” So Jacon moved to Boston and became involved in work much more meaningful to him than before.

Jacon wanted to do something that allowed for him to “do some good in the world,” for his actions to have a ripple effect, and that’s how he ended up at Dana Hall and Wellesley High School. After moving to Boston, Jacon took a job at a nonprofit that allowed for him to help some inner city kids in East Boston. He didn’t feel that he needed to “save the world everyday,” but helping disadvantaged youth had a lot more appeal compared to his last job.

Jacon volunteered at the Boston Debate League and worked at a non profit sailing club, but after the sailing place closed down he decided to move on to different work.

Jacon felt he could create a bigger impact by working with privileged youth today by using his power as a teacher.  He explains: “I believe working with high privileged populous is actually helping influence their value structure.” What better place to do that then a private school in Wellesley?

Dana Hall is filled with privileged kids who all have the potential to create real change in this world. “We need the rich and powerful to voluntarily give up what they have,” Jacon said when explaining how current class and power structures could potentially change in a non-violent way.

Jacon does not feel like he needed to save the world every day. He does, however, believe there needs to be “a kernel of good in what [he] did.”